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We may be done, but we're not finished.

Finish what you started in me, God. Your love is eternal—don’t quit on me now! Ps 138:8

Finding Our Footing

Lavish Extravagance

  By Ava Pennington— As you shopped for...

Ambitious Success

  By Ava Pennington— For twenty years, I...

So Long, Farewell…

Friends,

MyPurposeNow.org will be four years old this month. The site development was a gift from Deb’s son, Cameron for Mother’s Day. It was the push we needed to move from “it’s a really good idea, to let’s do this!”

The past several months have brought many changes to each of our lives. They are all positive changes and we are grateful to have the opportunity to take them on. But taking on new opportunities has meant the need to evaluate all the other commitments in our lives.

After much prayer and discussion, we agree that it’s time to let MPN go. We published our final post on May 1. We will not remove the site from the web and will continue to maintain the site’s domain name so the wonderful body of work created here will still be available.

We have been blessed to have so many talented and wonderful writers – women of God who joined us on this journey. We thank each of them – they have been such a blessing to us and to our readers.

Thank you for four fabulous years – we’ve loved interacting with you. Our prayer is you will continue to live big and pursue your purpose now!

Find Karen DeArmond Gardner on her blog Chaos to Castles

Find Deb DeArmond on her author website Family Matters

Blessings to you all~

Karen and Deb

IS THIS AS GOOD AS IT GETS?

 

By Ava Pennington—

A friend recently posted on Facebook:
“Not the happiest of days in my life. God must have bigger plans for me.”

I’ve had days like that.

When I didn’t get the job.
When a relationship became damaged.
When the medication wasn’t effective.

At the end of days like these, I’ve comforted myself with the assurance that God will fix it.

But what if He doesn’t?

What if there isn’t a better job waiting for me?
What if the relationship will never be repaired?
What if the illness is terminal?

What if today is as good as this life will ever get?

I’m not talking about eternity. Christians have the assurance that eternal life will be way better than what we have now. But what about now?

I’ve often comforted myself with assurances such as God has something better for me, or God will restore that relationship or God will heal me. Still, God may choose not to do these things. Some Christians never receive the jobs they want, the restored relationships they seek, or the healing they’re praying for.

Maybe the problem lies in how we define better.

I admit it. I usually define better in terms of more money, physical healing, happy relationships, and anything else that makes life easier, pain-free, and pleasant.

But God defines better as being more like Christ.

“And we all, who with unveiled faces contemplate the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit.” (II Corinthians 3:18 NIV).

Being more like Christ includes being humble, having a servant’s heart, and focusing on the eternal over the temporal. Problem is, those characteristics are almost always the result of problems…lots of problems.

When my definition of better doesn’t line up with God’s definition, I will be forever disappointed. Life will continually fall short of what I imagine it should be.

But when I define better as God defines it, then I’ll see the value in suffering, the good in disappointment, and the blessing in not getting what I thought I wanted. I’ll see the message in the mess, the testimony in the test, and the triumph in the trial. I’m not always there – some days it’s easier than others for me to line up my perspective with God’s perspective.

And, of course, it helps to constantly remind myself that everything that happens in this life is preparing me for eternity, when life really will be as good as it gets.

“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son” (Romans 8:28-29 NIV).

 

 

 

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© 2010 Martin Alan Grivjack PhotographyMartin Alan Grivjack PhotographyAva Pennington is thoroughly enjoying her second career as an author, teacher, and speaker. Originally from New York City, she relocated after a 20-year corporate career as a Human Resources executive. But don’t call her retired. In addition to writing and speaking, she teaches a Bible Study Fellowship (BSF) class of 200+ women from September through May each year.

Her newest book, Daily Reflections on the Names of God: A Devotional, is published by Revell and endorsed by Kay Arthur, founder of Precepts Ministries International. Ava has also written articles for magazines such as Power for LivingCalled, and Christianity Today’s Today’s Christian Woman. She has been published in 25 anthologies, including 18 Chicken Soup for the Soul books.

Ava is grateful for her husband, Russ, their marriage of 35+ years, and their home in south Florida. She is a passionate speaker and teacher, and delights in challenging audiences with relevant, enjoyable presentations. For more information, visit www.AvaWrites.com or contact her at Ava@AvaWrites.com.

Latest Article

TRIAGE

By Sharon Ruff—

I had no profound prayer words left to wrap around the excruciating suffering that blanketed each person on my growing prayer list. Their urgent physical, emotional, relational, and spiritual needs seemed to mirror the aches of humanity. So, with such a feeling of helplessness, I simply slid my fingertips gently over each name like a child learning Braille. As tears slipped down my cheeks, Oh God, have mercy, was all my heart could whisper. I felt like I was suffocating under the weight their suffering. Then suddenly God gave me an idea.

Rather than writing each person’s name down in the order I received them from phone calls, emails, and texts, I began to “triage” people like a hospital does for its incoming patients. Next I sectioned off my legal pad into distinct columns based on the level of need. I had Emergency, Critical, Struggling, and Care and Concern. Now I was able to quickly discern the level of care each situation needed. I didn’t feel so helpless and overwhelmed when I got inundated with prayer requests. As circumstances changed, I could easily “transfer” people to a different level of prayer.

I’ve also learned another effective way to minister to these folks who are scattered around the world.  I prop my legal pad in a chair, kneel in front of it, and then take out my musty old hymnal. I select a hymn that seems just right for each person’s need and sing them a sweet song.   My favorites are Breathe on Me Breath of God, and Fill My Cup Lord. The words and music are a healing balm reaching down to the very depths of pain—theirs and mine.

Many times I pick up sadness, despair, confusion, and hopelessness when I receive news of tragic circumstances. At those times, I feel like a lone ambulance driver gripping the wheel as he races his dying patients to the hospital. It was God who corrected my thinking. He is the ambulance driver. He is the hospital. He is the Great Physician. I realize that my job is simply to assure the patient of God’s loving care and help during the journey.

The shift to triaging the incoming wounded has brought order and peace to the chaos of my prayer life. Gently releasing everyone into God’s hands has freed me from emotional heaviness, from drama and trauma that I am exposed to each day.

God is our safe place and our strength.
He is always our help when we are in trouble.
So we will not be afraid, even if the earth is shaken
and the mountains fall into the center of the sea,
and even if its waters go wild with storm
and the mountains shake with its action.
(Psalm 46:1-3 NLV)

 

 

 

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Sharon RuffSharon Ruff: Sharon makes her home in West Michigan near her children and grandchildren. She has been a widow for over a decade after being married for 30 years; fifteen of which were spent caring for her husband who suffered from MS. During those wilderness years of isolation and despair, God gave her hope from Jeremiah 29:11. He also assured her that He would restore the years the locust had eaten. He has since graced her with many opportunities to heal, learn, grow, and serve in women’s ministry through Bible Studies, retreats, conferences and personal ministry. She has also ministered in the Ukraine and Africa at women’s conferences.

IS GOD REALLY JEALOUS?

 

By Ava Pennington—

After a severe loss, a friend told me she was done with believing in the God of the Bible. She said, “Your God is too cruel. How could I believe in a god who allows atrocities to be committed on children?”

A few months later, a celebrity talk show host said she could no longer believe in the God of the Bible because he called himself a jealous God.

Both of these instances caused me to examine my understanding of God…and theirs. If the source of our understanding is not what God says about himself, then we’re guilty of making God fit our expectations and desires.

It doesn’t help when names and attributes of God that comforted countless generations are misunderstood. For example, when God calls himself Jealous, what does that mean?

Isn’t jealousy a negative characteristic? Aren’t jealous people simply revealing their insecurities and their desire to possess what they don’t have?

In our culture, we have come to relate jealousy with pettiness or someone who is suspicious of a rival. But jealous can also refer to vigilance in guarding or protecting something or someone.

God wants to protect his people from worshipping anything other than him – not because he is insecure, but because he wants his best for us.

God is jealous in that he guards and protects us from things that are not in our best interests. Loving parents are protective of their children’s choices. They grieve when their children succumb to destructive influences in their lives. I’m glad God does nothing less for us!

“Do not worship any other god, for the Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God” (Exodus 34:14).

 

 

 

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© 2010 Martin Alan Grivjack PhotographyMartin Alan Grivjack PhotographyAva Pennington is thoroughly enjoying her second career as an author, teacher, and speaker. Originally from New York City, she relocated after a 20-year corporate career as a Human Resources executive. But don’t call her retired. In addition to writing and speaking, she teaches a Bible Study Fellowship (BSF) class of 200+ women from September through May each year.

Her newest book, Daily Reflections on the Names of God: A Devotional, is published by Revell and endorsed by Kay Arthur, founder of Precepts Ministries International. Ava has also written articles for magazines such as Power for LivingCalled, and Christianity Today’s Today’s Christian Woman. She has been published in 25 anthologies, including 18 Chicken Soup for the Soul books.

Ava is grateful for her husband, Russ, their marriage of 35+ years, and their home in south Florida. She is a passionate speaker and teacher, and delights in challenging audiences with relevant, enjoyable presentations. For more information, visit www.AvaWrites.com or contact her at Ava@AvaWrites.com.

The Vitamin D of Following Jesus

By Kathy Carlton Willis—

I’m D-termined to make the 50s my best decade yet. Not to make me better, but to be so emptied out of self that the Spirit has free reign and rein (supreme control) to work in and through me.

I want to be so filled with Him that I’m not:

  • Preoccupied and sidetracked in a way that diverts me from God’s best life for me.
  • Troubled and bothered by the concerns and worries that destroy peace.
  • Discouraged and dejected by the sad and depressing elements of life.
  • Deviating from the normal standard of daily living.
  • Disturbed by the upsets that interrupt order, which deliver chaos.

I want to be so filled with Him that I’m:

  • Keeping close control on dreadful habits, to stay on focus for God’s desires in my life.
  • Rather than determined to get and do what benefits self, devoted to serving the Savior.
  • Deferring to the direction of the Lord to lead my steps.
  • Continued development in spiritual formation, following the mentorship of Bible teachers.
  • In all this, to increase in joy, desperate to see the blessings even in the midst of devastation.

When we delete the unhealthy D-stractions and add in the healthy Vitamin Ds, we are equipped to follow after Him and make Him known. BIG glory for Jesus, little steps of obedience for me. Not in a way that feels pressured or coerced, but serving Him and others out of the sheer joy of it all.

Dr. Lydia Floren calls it the life of following. I want to dedicate my life to following the only one worth giving my life in pursuit of following Him.

Want to join me? Take your Vitamin D!

 

 

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Kathy Carlton Willis: Kathy writes and speaks with a balance of funny and faith—whimsy and wisdom. Not many funny girls also have Bible degrees! As a pastor’s wife, she has plenty of material for her new Grin with Kathy column at MPN. She has four books coming out in the next couple of years: Speaker to SpeakerGrin with GraceGrin with Joy, and Grin with Peace. She’s affiliated with several Christian writer and speaker organizations and serves as a consultant for others in the publishing industry. Kathy anticipates great things for her 50s (despite the menopause monster), and is pursuing God’s goals with gusto as she dives in to this glorious decade. Kathy’s tagline captures her essence: Light & Lively: His Reflection/Her Laughter. Learn more about Kathy at: www.kathycarltonwillis.com/

It’s a Matter of Prayer

By Penny A. Bragg—

Do you know of a struggling marriage? More than likely you do. Satan is serving up marriages on a skewer and it’s tearing our nation apart.

Every troubled marriage has the hope of being a saved marriage. In our work as marriage missionaries, my husband and I have seen many miracles occur in these shattered relationships through prayer. As a result, we’ve refined our prayers to cover most of the issues that marriages in crisis face, using the acrostic CRISIS. The prayer suggestions and scriptures in this post are not listed in any particular order, however, I firmly believe each individual spouse’s intimate relationship with God (or lack thereof) is where crisis ends and reconciliation begins.

Conviction – Often times, there is an unwillingness on the part of one or both spouses to own up to their part of the breakdown. Regardless of what has transpired, pray for both parties to stop pointing fingers at each other and, instead, bring their own individual hearts before God in daily examination. May each spouse humble him/herself, confess their sins, repent, and ask God for forgiveness. If there is a “prodigal spouse” fleeing the marriage, pray that he/she would quickly get to the “bottom of the bottom,” come to Christ in repentance, and seek His forgiveness. Then, do the same thing with his/her spouse and family with a sincere heart and desire to change sinful patterns and divisive behaviors. Psalm 51, John 8:1-11, Romans 3:21-26

Resources – It is vital to equip willing spouses with biblically-based reconciliation resources. Many times, only one spouse is interested in working on the marriage Pray not only for the reconciliation resources needed, but that hearts would be open to using these materials, seeking God’s wisdom, and following a path toward reconciliation. 2 Corinthians 5:11-21, Proverbs 2:1-11

Intimacy – There is always an intimacy issue involved when a marriage is in crisis. Pray for both spouses to strengthen their individual intimate relationships with God. Pray that whatever forms of “counterfeit” intimacy have come into play in the marriage (such as addictions, affairs, idolatry, career pursuits, strongholds, etc.) will be acknowledged, and that a pursuit to discovering individual wholeness and healing in Christ be the highest priority. 2 Corinthians 10:3-5, John 4:1-28

Stability – Due to the emotional upheaval of a marriage in crisis, most routines, procedures, and schedules are completely disrupted. Pray for normal routines and procedures to take root, especially for the sake of the children involved. Pray for adequate rest, a balanced diet, exercise, regular school/work and church attendance to be established and consistent. If there are children involved, pray for their emotional stability and safety by “clothing” them in God’s spiritual armor through prayer. Romans 8:15-17, Ephesians 6:10-20

Intervention – When a marriage is in crisis, it is necessary to pray for intervention on several fronts. First, pray for the Divine intervention of our Almighty God to come against all forms of retaliation, harm, and/or plans for harm, division, divorce, etc. Ask God to restrain all the evil that Satan has launched to damage the marriage so the truth and love of God can miraculously intervene and pierce the darkness. Pray against a spouse making desperate attempts to pursue his/her prodigal spouse, and instead, to redirect that energy toward pursuing God. Finally, pray for both spouses to restrain from making emotionally-based decisions, listening to opinions of those who want to divide the marriage, and/or pursuing legal action. Pray that they would forgive one another. Colossians 3:12-14, Matthew 19:5-6, Malachi 2:15-17

Support – Pray for at least one godly accountability/prayer partner to come alongside each spouse to support the reconciliation process and provide wise counsel. Pray for a person who will meet with and mentor each spouse on a weekly basis to keep him/her focused on God. If one spouse has been abandoned, pray for the anchoring hope of Christ to support him/her as the battle wages long. In addition, pray for the establishment of a well-rounded support system to help shoulder the crisis, especially where emotional needs of spouses and children are involved. Proverbs 4:1-9, Hebrews 6:17-20, Romans 15:13

Remember, even when only one spouse wants to work on the marriage (which is often the case) let God work with the one heart He has. Many marriages have turned around because one spouse focused on God. NOTHING is impossible for Him!

 

 

 

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Penny BraggPenny A. Bragg spent the majority of her professional career in the California public school system as a teacher, principal, and district administrator. Through the miraculous reconciliation of her marriage after an eleven-year divorce and a distance of 3,000 coast-to-coast miles, God led Penny and her husband, Clint, into fulltime ministry in 2006. Together, they serve as marriage missionaries—sharing their testimony of marital restoration across the nation and abroad during their 40-Day Marriage Mission Trips. Through Inverse Ministries, their non-profit organization, Penny and Clint have written extensively about the ministry of reconciliation including their upcoming book, Marriage on the Mend—Healing Your Relationship After Crisis, Separation, and Divorce (Kregel, 2015). In addition, Penny ministers to those who, like her, have experienced traumatic loss. Her book, “For Those Who Weep—A Grief Response Journal,” (Redemption Press, 2014) is available at www.ForThoseWhoWeep.com.

lady in waiting

 

 

By Ava Pennington—

Wait. It’s a four-letter word in more ways than one.

I hate waiting.

  • Waiting in lines at the post office.
  • Waiting for a green light at intersections.
  • Waiting for answers to prayer.

That last one is the worst. Waiting for answers to prayer. Especially when I know the prayer request is something that lines up with what the Bible teaches.

If it’s God’s will for someone to know Him, then why doesn’t He answer my prayer for that person’s salvation? Or if I’m praying for Christians to step forward to serve in ministry so others will have an opportunity to learn God’s Word, why doesn’t He immediately grant that request?

Perhaps it goes back to what Oswald Chambers once said:

“If God sees that my spiritual life will be furthered by giving the things for which I ask, then He will give them, but that is not the end of prayer. The end of prayer is that I come to know God Himself.”

The wait for answers is not just about the answers. Instead, it may be more about aligning my heart with God’s heart. My desires with His desires.

The longer I pray about something, if I’m asking with the right spirit, I begin to understand things in a different way.

The salvation of that loved one? I see God working behind the scenes to soften hearts in a way that may touch more than one life. He is also working on me so I won’t see that person’s salvation as another notch on my Christian gun belt.

The need for ministry workers? I see God using the wait to teach me to depend on Him alone. He is also using the time to teach those waiting that the opportunity to study His Word is a privilege not to be taken lightly.

Being a lady in waiting isn’t easy for me. I wonder if it ever will be. But as I wait, my perspective changes. Slowly but surely, I see beyond my own desires to what God is accomplishing in me and in those around me for His glory.

How well do you wait?

“For from days of old they have not heard or perceived by ear, Nor has the eye seen a God besides You, Who acts in behalf of the one who waits for Him” (Isaiah 64:4 NASB).

 

 

 

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© 2010 Martin Alan Grivjack PhotographyMartin Alan Grivjack PhotographyAva Pennington is thoroughly enjoying her second career as an author, teacher, and speaker. Originally from New York City, she relocated after a 20-year corporate career as a Human Resources executive. But don’t call her retired. In addition to writing and speaking, she teaches a Bible Study Fellowship (BSF) class of 200+ women from September through May each year.

Her newest book, Daily Reflections on the Names of God: A Devotional, is published by Revell and endorsed by Kay Arthur, founder of Precepts Ministries International. Ava has also written articles for magazines such as Power for LivingCalled, and Christianity Today’s Today’s Christian Woman. She has been published in 25 anthologies, including 18 Chicken Soup for the Soul books.

Ava is grateful for her husband, Russ, their marriage of 35+ years, and their home in south Florida. She is a passionate speaker and teacher, and delights in challenging audiences with relevant, enjoyable presentations. For more information, visit www.AvaWrites.com or contact her at Ava@AvaWrites.com.

The Call of the Butterfly

By Denise Vredevoogd—

I recently visited the annual spring butterfly exhibit at our local botanical garden. Warm, moist tropical air soothed my winter weary soul as I watched the delicate creatures flit from orchid to palm leaf. Their graceful, effortless movement reminded me of a parable I heard years ago. Here is my revised and abbreviated version.

There once was a young boy who came upon a butterfly struggling to break free of its chrysalis. As the butterfly squirmed and wriggled, the boy was filled with compassion and ever so gently began to widen the opening of the chrysalis, making it easier for the fragile creature to make its way into the world. Releasing the damp-winged beauty into the palm of his hand, he waited for it to spread its wings and fly. But soon the writhing ceased and the butterfly became still.

How can this be? The young boy wondered. Saddened by the result of his effort to help, he showed the lifeless butterfly to his father. His father wisely explained that the process of straining to leave the chrysalis strengthened the butterfly’s tiny muscles and pushed the necessary fluid into its wings so that he could lift himself into the air. Without the struggle, the butterfly could not do what he was created to do.

I thought about this story as I looked at the exhibit’s showcase, where a variety of chrysalises had been pinned in long rows, each one a miracle waiting for the moment of release. Cozy and snug, secure and safe, they could stay in their tiny self-made homes or they could follow nature’s call, gradually building up their strength by squirming and stretching and spreading their wings to freedom.

There is something about spring, about dry bulbs sprouting tender shoots, about lime green leaves unfolding on trees, about blue speckled eggs cracking open in their nests, about a chrysalis splitting open. That something teaches us about resurrection, about being made new and changing from one form into another.

Our old natures tend to avoid change, to resist risk. The status quo calls louder than “let go.” Becoming who God created us to be is a struggle. To be more loving, we might have to deal with unlovable people. To become wise, we might be given problems to solve. To learn patience, we may have to wait for answers. To develop courage, we have to face our fears. To fly into the freedom Christ’s resurrection promises, we have to beat our wings against the comfort zone of our own chrysalis. There is no shortcut and no one can do it for us, or we will wither like the butterfly in the young boy’s palm.

But we don’t have to do it alone. The same power which raised Jesus from the dead flows through our spiritual wings. “With that same spirit of faith we also believe and therefore speak, because we know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus from the dead will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you in his presence…Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day” (2 Corinthians 4:13-16).

As you witness nature’s renewal all around you this spring, think about the metamorphosis that God wants to bring about in your own life. “He who was seated on the throne said, ‘I am making everything new!’” (Revelation 21:5)

 

 

 

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DeniseDenise Vredevoogd is grateful for her life as a wife and the mother of two daughters, two sons, and a daughter-in-law. A former English teacher, she now enjoys freelance editing, tutoring, and reading with second graders. She’s also devoted to dozens of students, ages 5-65, with whom she shares the love of music in her private piano studio. Accompanying, reading, writing, gardening, flower-arranging, and spending time with family and friends are all gifts from the hand of Father God, “from whom all blessings flow.” She is a co-leader for West Michigan Word Weavers and on the planning committee for the annual Breathe writers’ conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Her blog, www.fearnot365.wordpress.com, provides a glimpse into the many verses in the Bible that encourage us to live life with confident trust.

MAKING MEMORIES

By Mona Shriver—

We took our two five year old granddaughter’s camping last weekend. It’s a lot of work but we wanted to make memories. We’d taken them last year and they’d had a blast. Who would have thought four year old girls would get the most fun out of a pail, shovel, and a small hill of dirt. They had spent two days on the little rise at the edge of our campsite. I’d never seen such filthy children. But it had been wonderful and we wanted to repeat it.

So once again, out I went to the dollar stores to find stuff they could entertain themselves with and of course making sure we still had the pails and shovels for their favorite activity. This year however, they hardly spent any time on the hill but found parachuting bunnies to be the highlight. Just about the time you think you’ve got them figured out…

But the goal had been to make memories. So who cared what activity supplied the memory? Then I put them to bed Friday night. As they were getting settled in their new Hello Kitty sleeping bags, Serenity looked at me and said “Grandma, can we have our flashlights?” I looked at her and said “Flashlights?” wondering what she was talking about. I hadn’t gotten them any flashlights this year. The she said, “Yeah, the flashlights we had last time. Mine was blue and Kaycee’s was red.” Then I remembered, I had gotten them flashlights last year but had forgotten all about them. I opened the cupboard where we kept the flashlights in the trailer, and sure enough buried under several others was one small blue and one small red flashlight. It had been over a year since they’d seen them. Yet they remembered. And I realized we had made a memory—it was firmly entrenched in their little minds. I grabbed the flashlights and handed each girl her own. Making memories.

We often think about this with our children or grandchildren. People we want to remember us. The one who loved me. The one who played with me. The one who told me about Jesus. It is a good thing.

In Paul’s instructions to Titus, he affirms that older women are to teach the younger women. Read Titus 2:3-5. We so often think about that in long term relationships and mentoring. But what about those with whom we don’t spend a lot of time?

When I think about my own memories from other women in the church it often has been a brief encounter. The elderly woman who’d recently had a stroke, sitting outside on the step at a retreat, doing her assignment of journaling. The most spiritually mature woman I’d ever met, admitting in a class that she struggled with giving financially. A woman who called me one day after Bible study, saying she’d noticed I’d been quiet, asking if anything was wrong. I’d been struggling that day but hadn’t said a word to anyone about my struggle. In a five minute phone call she wrapped me in Jesus’ arms. I, to this day, can’t remember who she was, but I remember how God used her in those five minutes.

So what about those others? The ones we briefly come into contact with. Do I make any effort to “make memories” with them? Do I purpose that they’ll have a positive memory of me—even if they might not remember my name?

Memories are not always made on the hill digging dirt. Sometimes they come in little red and blue flashlights.

 

 

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Mona Shriver: Mona Shriver worked as a nurse until the Lord called her out of that profession and into ministry. She is a Precept trained Bible teacher, has been active in women’s ministries, and speaks at special events and retreats. She serves her local church body in central California. She is a writer and has been published in various magazines and ministry resources. Mona has been married to Gary since 1974 and they have 3 grown sons and 2 precious granddaughters. She and Gary co-founded Hope & Healing Ministries Inc. which provides support and resources for couples in adultery recovery. They co-authored the book: Unfaithful, Hope and Healing after Infidelity. Learn more at “http://www.hopeandhealing.us ”

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Faith Happenings!!

Faith Happenings!!

My Purpose Now is pleased to introduce you to a new and exciting website, FaithHappenings.com. Designed to serve the Christ follower, Faith Happenings is billed as “Your complete, tailored, faith resource.” Listings by state and region will help you find events, churches, conferences, concerts and more in your backyard or across the nation. The authors at MPN will be featured in a weekly blog entitled, Freedom @ 50+ There are sections for homeschoolers, moms, empty nesters, singles and more!

Your Journey Starts Here